Ripple Effects: How We’re Loving Our Lakes to Death

The University of Wisconsin Press

$26.95

ISBN: 9780299339609
Pages: 288
Size: 6 x 9

Our inland lakes are under stress – from invasive species, nutrient pollution, unwise development, defective septic systems, climate change, and more. Ripple Effects looks in depth at these threats to lakes in the glaciated region of the Upper Midwest and outlines potential remedies for them. Based on extensive research and more than 70 interviews with lake scientists, lake association leaders, and other experts, it sounds an alarm about the future of the lakes, while offering affirmative steps all of us can take to help safeguard the lakes for today and generations to come.

“Illuminates the tight connection between what we do on the land, the health of our lakes, and the health of our economy and communities. This book will forever change how you think about lakes and the Northwoods. And it offers insights into what you can do to protect our beloved lakes, and make them more resilient in the face of environmental change in our rapidly changing world.” Jake Vander Zanden, Director Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin–Madison

“In Ripple Effects, Rulseh describes in engaging detail the pressures we’re putting on our beloved lakes and offers solutions that are within reach of everyday people. He expertly weaves personal experiences and extensive research into an invaluable lake stewardship guidebook for anyone who loves lakes.” Jo Latimore, Senior Outreach Specialist Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

“A marvelously thorough synopsis of the many daunting issues surrounding lake management. Rulseh utilizes case studies, interviews, and a storytelling format to frame the issues, making the book an easy and pleasurable read. He also doesn’t leave the reader wallowing in the problems, instead offering sage advice on the many ways we can turn our love of waters into positive actions to protect them. Highly recommended.”John Bates, author of Wisconsin’s Wild Lakes: A Guide to the Last Undeveloped Natural Lakes

“Illuminates the tight connection between what we do on the land, the health of our lakes, and the health of our economy and communities. This book will forever change how you think about lakes and the Northwoods. And it offers insights into what you can do to protect our beloved lakes, and make them more resilient in the face of environmental change in our rapidly changing world.”—Jake Vander Zanden, director of the Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin–Madison

“Wonderfully researched and richly detailed. At a time when more and more people are searching out our waters for their livelihood, for recreation and relaxation, and for building cherished memories with friends and family, Ted Rulseh’s rich and readable book tells us not only how intimately connected we are to our waters but how the fate of water is our fate as well. In the end, Rulseh’s story is a hopeful invitation, providing those who love lakes and are in a position to protect them the understanding and tools they need to reverse these disturbing trends.”Jeff Forester, executive director, Minnesota Lakes and Rivers Advocates

“A lush and absorbing story of the Northwood’s glacial lakes region, told in personal vignettes that are delightful reflections of its history, its unique beauty and the challenges it faces from an increasing population of admirers who are loving it to death. With an easy style and depth of understanding, Rulseh weaves an engaging tale that provides a clear appreciation of the lake environment and a glimpse of how we might save it for our children. He is both student and teacher and now an influential steward of our Northern Highland region. He has crafted a very important piece for our Lake Country.” John Richter, President, Plum Lake Association and Wisconsin Shoreland Alliance

“Ripple Effects time travels over the past century on our Midwestern Lakes. Rulseh looks at the human impacts on our riparian world from both Environmental and Societal aspects and calls out warnings and practical solutions for all of us who love our lakes.” — Dave Maturen, President, Michigan Lakes and Streams Association

In Ripple Effects. Ted Rulseh captures a lifetime of lakeshore living and recent conversations with scientists and community leaders to call attention to the links between our actions and the unintended harms to lake ecosystems and communities. Most important, Ted provides practical guidance on how we can be better stewards of our lakes. We can all use good advice for better living at the cabin to ensure that these places continue to attract, amaze, and reinvigorate. This book will help you in that effort. Paul J. Radomski, Minnesota DNR, Author of “Walleye: A Beautiful Fish of the Dark”